Is uncommon intelligence or intensity a gift?



Willem Kuipers is author of the book Enjoying the Gift of Being Uncommon: Extra Intelligent, Intense, and Effective.

In a section of the book – Is it a Gift to be Uncommon? – he writes about how people who are Xi [eXtra Intelligent or Intense] may view their exceptional abilities.

Here is an excerpt:

Giftedness refers literally to special talents, somehow provided at birth.

Extra intelligence refers literally to an uncommon overdose, compared to standard availability.

It is well known that the label gifted is generally not welcomed by the person in question, whether child or adult.

This can be due to worries about possible stigmatization as a strange exception to normal, or about the implied expectation or felt obligation to be an outstanding performer…

Others may consider it an act of God, a weird trick of fate, a cosmic joke or a genetic inevitability. But in all cases there is most often a drive to do something special with it, a sense of mission, even when the mission itself is far from understood as yet.

Continued in High Ability post Is uncommon intelligence a gift?

Originally posted 2011-06-16 22:41:19.

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Comments (2)

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  1. Hi Douglas,

    I think it’s very easy for children of uncommon or intense intelligence to feel stigmatized or less then good because of their “gift”, but that is mostly due to the wrong perception of those that surround them. The truth is that there is not strange with children like that, but rather it is the rest of us that are strange for suppressing or not exploring fully the gifts and talents that we were born with, that may not be as obvious or as glamorous as the ones of extremely high intelligence, but that doesn’t mean they’re not there.

    Thanks for posting this!

    Josip Barbaric

  2. Hi Douglas,

    I think it’s very easy for children of uncommon or intense intelligence to feel stigmatized or less then good because of their “gift”, but that is mostly due to the wrong perception of those that surround them. The truth is that there is not strange with children like that, but rather it is the rest of us that are strange for suppressing or not exploring fully the gifts and talents that we were born with, that may not be as obvious or as glamorous as the ones of extremely high intelligence, but that doesn’t mean they’re not there.

    Thanks for posting this!

    Josip Barbaric

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