Brit Marling: “A pull between art and commerce”



Brit Marling

“It’s so true that now if you want to be an artist you have to be an entrepreneur too.”
Brit Marling

From interview by Susan Sarandon, the lab magazine [photo by Hilary Walsh].

Here are a couple of ventures I have come across to help creative people be more successful as entrepreneurs:

Joseph Gordon-Levitt is the founder and director of hitRECord.org.

He comments: “In a nutshell: we create and develop art and media collaboratively here on our site; we use my position in the traditional entertainment industry to turn that creativity into money-making productions; and then we share any profits with the contributing artists. In a nutter shell, we just have fun making things together. Videos, writing, photography, music, anything…”

From post: Joseph Gordon-Levitt on hitRECord and collective creation

“Making money is art and working is art and good business is the best art.” – Andy Warhol

From my post  Creativity and Commerce which includes quotes from articles including : Those “Crazy” Business Ideas Often Turn Out to Be the Best By Valerie Young, “Dreamer in Residence” at ChangingCourse, offering “resources to help you discover your life mission and live it.”

See many articles, programs and other resources for developing your creative interests and talents as a business on my site The Inner Entrepreneur

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Brit Marling is co-writer, producer, and star of acclaimed movies, “Sound of My Voice” and “Another Earth,” as well as the upcoming “The East.” She attended Georgetown University, and commented in a magazine interview about being drawn in at least two career directions.

“I was a double econ-studio art major. So I’d be in the darkroom developing photos, then in the library doing economic regressions. So clearly I felt this pull between art and commerce.”

The article notes, “She excelled at both, going on to become the class valedictorian… She spent a summer interning for Goldman Sachs, at the end of which she was offered a job. Suddenly, Marling says, the choice was clear.

“I can’t fully explain it,” she says. “It was a hard decision for all my life until it came to a point where it was suddenly the easiest decision ever. I reached an epiphany where I wasn’t afraid anymore.

“I knew my life was going to be a blink — it’s the universe losing an eyelash or shrugging a shoulder or tossing her hair back. Something in me broke, and I knew I couldn’t live my backup plan anymore.”

From Sundance Star Brit Marling Commands the Screen in ‘Sound of My Voice’ By Jenelle Riley, Backstage.

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This pull in different life and career directions is one of the themes of the writing and coaching of Tama Kieves - she is an inspiring example of someone who has overcome the pressures to keep following a path on which her high intelligence gained her many rewards, but at too great a spiritual cost because she was denying her creative passions.

She had graduated with honors from Harvard Law School, but left her career as “an overworked attorney” to follow her “soul’s haunting desire to become a writer.”

In her new book she addresses challenges that many creative, high ability people may face – and provides stories and strategies for inspiration. Here is an excerpt:

“It takes stubborn originality to make it as an artist, entrepreneur, innovator, or change agent of any kind. You are a channel for inspiration, a new artery of the extraordinary, and it’s your role to tend, trust, and birth this expression, not to deny it, twist it, or make it seem like everything else.

“It’s not like anything else. And that would be the point.”

- From book Inspired and Unstoppable: Wildly Succeeding in Your Life’s Work! by Tama J. Kieves.

Read more in post Tama Kieves on inspired desire and new directions.

Also see my site High Ability

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Originally posted 2013-04-05 21:13:42.

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